8th Class of Leland International Hunger Fellows Launched

October 26, 2015

Emily Byers, Co-Director of Leland International Hunger Fellows Program, Congressional Hunger Center

The Congressional Hunger Center’s 8th class of Mickey Leland International Hunger Fellows began their two years of service on Sept. 21. When they complete the program in August 2017, these fellows will be equipped with in-depth knowledge of both food security field programming and policy work and ready to be leaders in the fight against hunger worldwide.

Leland Fellows are placed with host organizations that are doing effective food and nutrition security work. They spend the first year in Asia, Africa, or Latin America working directly with farmers, mothers, small-business owners and local NGOs. In the second year fellows apply what they learned in the field to the development of sound organizational and governmental food security policies, usually at the headquarters of their host organization. CHC looks for field and policy assignments that are closely coordinated so that fellows see firsthand how policy informs fieldwork and fieldwork informs policy.

6th class Leland Fellow Quinn Bernier conducts a focus group in western Kenya with farmers on climate smart agriculture practices for the World Agroforestry Center. Courtesy: Congressional Hunger Center

6th class Leland Fellow Quinn Bernier conducts a focus group in western Kenya with farmers on climate smart agriculture practices for the World Agroforestry Center. Courtesy: Congressional Hunger Center

Fellows work on a wide range of issues within food and nutrition security, including small-scale agricultural development; maternal and child nutrition; natural resource management; agribusiness development; and agriculture-nutrition linkages. Within these fields, fellows do a variety of types of work. Examples include monitoring and evaluating programs and projects; conducting primary research; developing technical training resources and conducting trainings; educating policy makers on food and nutrition security. Fellows are chosen because of their commitment to international anti-hunger work, technical skills, and leadership potential.

Here, in brief, are Leland’s 12 newest emerging anti-hunger leaders and the work they’ll be doing as fellows:

Carlo Abuyuan will be establishing referral systems to link nutrition, health and livelihood support with FHI 360 in Mkushi, Zambia and Washington, DC.

Meghan Anson will be integrating nutrition into programs and advocating for good nutrition policy with Concern Worldwide in Lilongwe, Malawi and Dublin.

Michelle DeFreese will be supporting the students and scholars at Sokoine University of Agriculture with iAGRI in Morogoro, Tanzania and the Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities in Washington, DC.

Amihan Jones will be evaluating and sharing learnings on activities designed to improve the nutrition and livelihoods of women and ethnic minorities with Save the Children in Kathmandu, Nepal and Washington, DC.

Jennie Lane will be researching livestock’s role in household livelihoods and nutrition and evaluating the Livestock Lead Farmers Program with Land O’Lakes in Lilongwe, Malawi and Washington, DC.

Miti Patel will be evaluating homestead gardening’s impact on nutrition and household income with Helen Keller International in Kathmandu, Nepal and Phnom Penh.

Caitlin Shaw will be researching the impact of conservation agriculture on productivity and income with PCI in Zomba, Malawi and Washington, DC.

Julia Shuck will be developing effective ways to communicate research findings in order to promote the productivity and stewardship of common lands with the Foundation for Ecological Security in Anand, India and IFPRI in Washington, DC.

Harley Stokes will be assessing and evaluating nutrition-sensitive agriculture interventions with Catholic Relief Services in Baucau, Timor-Leste and Washington, DC.

Luis Cabrera, 6th class fellow placed with the World Food Program, interviews a farmer about her food security near Quiche, Guatemala. Courtesy: Congressional Hunger Center

Luis Cabrera, 6th class fellow placed with the World Food Program, interviews a farmer about her food security near Quiche, Guatemala. Courtesy: Congressional Hunger Center

Hanneke Van Dyke will be managing coordination, monitoring and learnings from the Home Grown School Feeding Program with the World Food Program in Siem Reap and Phnom Penh, Cambodia.

Zoe VanGelder will be developing and advocating enabling policies for smallholder rice farmers and evaluating rural credit models with Oxfam America in Port-au-Prince, Haiti and Washington, DC.

Michael Wilcox will be developing and piloting a training curriculum to boost small-scale farmers’ productivity with ACDI/VOCA in Tamale, Ghana and Washington, DC.