Feeding the Most Vulnerable Communities in the Most Sustainable Way

March 28, 2016

The Alliance to End Hunger is excited to welcome InStove as a new member.

Adam Creighton, Development Director, InStove

InStove is a US-based non-profit organization dedicated to relieving suffering, improving health, and reducing harm to the environment through the design and distribution of efficient, biomass stoves and allied technologies to vulnerable populations worldwide.

Founders, retired carpenter Fred Colgan and retired engineer Damon Ogle in 2012 standing with a prototype of InStove’s first water pasteurizer system. Courtesy: InStove

Founders, retired carpenter Fred Colgan and retired engineer Damon Ogle in 2012 standing with a prototype of InStove’s first water pasteurizer system. Courtesy: InStove

Founded in 2012, InStove has primarily worked in sub-Saharan Africa and Haiti through implementing partnerships with local and multinational organizations. InStove provides technology that helps to reduce the demand for unsustainably-harvested fuel: i.e. large wood that only comes from harvesting whole trees. “InStoves [link:http://instove.org/60-100-liter-cookstove]” (which come in two sizes, 60 and 100 Liters) run efficiently on small amounts of small wood.

InStove was born when Engineer Damon Ogle met volunteer and retired carpenter Fred Colgan at Aprovecho Research Center in Oregon. The two shared a vision of an efficient biomass stove for institutional kitchens like those used by refugee camps, rural clinics, school feeding programs and orphanages to feed large numbers of people, reasoning that more impact can be achieved at the institutional than the household level. Compared to an open fire, InStoves are proven to:

  • Reduce cooking time by up to 50%
  • Reduce fuel use by 75-90%
  • Reduce harmful emissions by 90-98%

These savings translate into safer cooks and communities, healthier forests, a cleaner climate, and more money to spend on these institutions’ missions and beneficiaries.

InStoves use pots, woks, or pressure cookers. However, the stoves have additional applications that include:

  • Medical equipment and waste sterilization (included in World Health Organization’s “Compendium for innovative health technologies for low-resource settings”)
  • Water pasteurization
  • Agricultural applications (shea, poultry, parboiled rice, milk pasteurization, palm-oil, and alcohol brewing and distilling)
  • Hydronic heating

Our work was recognized by the Danish Sustainability think tank Sustainia as one of the 100 most sustainable innovations in the world.

InStove works with partners large and small, from UN Agencies and Aid organizations, to local NGOs,

The experience of many institutional cooks in the developing world includes high risk of burn injury, smoke-induced illnesses, blindness, and even premature death from working conditions—to say nothing of the risks of fuel gathering itself. Courtesy: InStove

The experience of many institutional cooks in the developing world includes high risk of burn injury, smoke-induced illnesses, blindness, and even premature death from working conditions—to say nothing of the risks of fuel gathering itself. Courtesy: InStove

small church groups, and individual donors with a kitchen to support in the developing world.

As a member of the Alliance to End Hunger, InStove hopes to be an ambassador of the improved cookstoves sector and a technical partner for those Alliance Partners whose work includes institutional feeding, or other programs where our technology may improve lives, save forests, protect the climate, and help feed the most vulnerable communities in the most sustainable way.