The study found that participating in SNAP for about six months was associated with an improvement in food security. SNAP was associated with a decrease in the percentage of households that were food insecure by 4.6 percentage points in the cross-sectional sample and 10.6 percentage points in the longitudinal sample. Participating in SNAP was also associated with a decrease in the percentage of households that experienced very low food security of 5.0 percentage points in the cross-sectional sample and 6.3 percentage points in the longitudinal sample. In terms of percentage changes, these translate into reductions in food insecurity of 7 percent in the cross-sectional sample and 16 percent in the longitudinal sample. The reductions in very low food security are 14 and 18 percent in the two samples, respectively. All associations are statistically significant at the 0.01 level.

The conclusion that SNAP is associated with an improvement in household food security generally holds for child food security as well. SNAP was associated with a decrease in the percentage of households with children in which children were food insecure in both samples. In addition, SNAP was associated with a decrease in the percentage of households in which children experienced very low food security in the cross-sectional sample, although there was no association in the longitudinal sample.

 

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Publication Date: 13-Aug
Published By: United States Department of Agriculture